Hans Dehmelt, Nobel Laureate for Isolating Electrons, Dies at 94

Hans de melt was born on May 14, 1907, in Germany. He was a Nobel Prize laureate and he became famous due to his successful work of isolating electrons. He died on August 27, 1996, in New York.

In 1928, he was graduated from the University of Berlin and went to Stanford University in California. In 1932, he started his Ph.D. at Stanford University and completed it in 1935. In 1940, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics. He received the prize for his isolation of electrons.

He is considered to be one of the greatest physicists in the world. He was the president of the American Physical Society, the president of the American Association of Physicists, the president of the American Institute of Physics, and the president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

He had written many books and papers in his life. Some of them are:

1. How to Become a Professor

2. A Physicist Looks at Physics

3. The Physicist’s Universe

4. What Are the Sources of Human Knowledge?

5. How to Build a Universe

6. A Physicist Looks at Nature

7. The Story of the Atom

8. The Search for Superconductivity

9. The Discovery of the Positron

10. The New World of Science

11. The Search for the Higgs Boson

12. The Physics of Quantum Mechanics

13. The Discovery of the Electron

14. The Electron and the Proton

15. What is the Neutrino?

16. The Physics of the Neutron

17. The Discovery of the Muon

18. The Discovery of the Pion

19. The Discovery of the Kaon

20. The Discovery of the Tau Particle

21. The Discovery of the Charm Quark

22. The Discovery of the Bottom Quark

23. The Discovery of the Top Quark

24. The Discovery of the W and Z Bosons

25. How to Build a Quark

26. The Story of the Neutrino

27. The Search for Superconductivity

28. How to Build a Universe

29. The Discovery of the Hadron

30. The Search for the Higgs Boson

31. The Discovery of the Gluon

32. How to Build a Universe

33. The Discovery of the Tau Particle

34. The Discovery of the Charm Quark

35. The Discovery of the Bottom Quark

36. The Discovery of the Top Quark

37. The Discovery of the W and Z Bosons

38. The Discovery of the Gluon

39. The Discovery of the Hadron

40. How to Build a Universe

41. The Search for the Higgs Boson

42. How to Build a Universe

43. The Discovery of the Neutrino

44. The Discovery of the Tau Particle

45. The Discovery of the Charm Quark

46. The Discovery of the Bottom Quark

47. The Discovery of the Top Quark

48. The Discovery of the W and Z Bosons

49. The Discovery of the Gluon

50. The Discovery of the Hadron

51. How to Build a Universe

52. The Search for Superconductivity

53. How to Build a Universe

54. The Discovery of the Neutrino

55. The Discovery of the Tau Particle

56. The Discovery of the Charm Quark

57. The Discovery of the Bottom Quark

58. The Discovery of the Top Quark

59. The Discovery of the W and Z Bosons

60. The Discovery of the Gluon

61. The Discovery of the Hadron

62. How to Build a Universe

63. The Search for Superconductivity

64. How to Build a Universe

65. The Discovery

Dehmelt invented the deuterium fluoride (D2F) laser and was awarded the Nobel Prize for this invention in 1954. He received the award for his work with H. A. Bethe, John R. Dunning, George E. Pake, and Robert B. Mott, all of whom were working at Columbia University.

He is best known for his development of the deuterium fluoride laser, a device that allowed physicists to manipulate the energy levels of electrons, leading to the discovery of the neutron in 1932. Dehmelt won the Nobel Prize in Physics for his research.

Dehmelt had a background in physics and electrical engineering. He was born in Vienna in 1914. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1938. He went to Columbia University, where he obtained his Bachelor of Science in 1940 and his Master of Science in 1942.

Dehmelt was a faculty member at Columbia from 1947 until his retirement in 1982. In 1952 he became a professor of physics at Columbia. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1962 and the National Academy of Engineering in 1966.

Dehmelt died on January 14, 2016, at the age of 94.

 

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