A look at the amount of U.S. spending powering Ukraine’s defense

How U.S. military aid has grown since the start of the war

The day after Russia invaded Ukraine, President Biden authorized a package of $350 million in military aid. It included small arms and munitions as well as body armor and equipment for “Ukraine’s front-line defenders,” the Pentagon said, and would be the first of dozens of packages announced for Ukraine as the war continued.

April 13,

2022

The first M-17 helicopters were authorized to be sent to Ukraine

Six months into the war, the Pentagon pledged its biggest tranche of security assistance yet, which represented “the beginning of a contracting process to provide additional priority capabilities to Ukraine in the mid- and long-term to ensure Ukraine can continue to defend itself,” the Defense Department said.

The Pentagon said Ukraine had received its first NASAMS for air defense as Russia began targeting infrastructure ahead of the winter.

Total after a year of war

One year into the war, the Biden administration announced an additional $2 billion in security assistance, “part of the commitment to Ukraine’s long-term security.”

Dozens of M1 Abrams training tanks arrived in Germany for U.S.-led training of Ukrainian forces. The shipment came less than a month before the spring counteroffensive began. One week later, Biden announced the U.S. and its allies would train Ukrainian fighter pilots on F-16 aircraft.

The most recent presidential drawdown.

Since the war started, the United

States has committed more than

in military aid to Ukraine.

Weapons and equipment from Defense Department stocks given by presidential drawdowns. These supplies are already manufactured and can be delivered quickly.

Funding pledged by the Pentagon to invest in more weapons, training, advising, logistics and equipment through the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative. These pledges represent a longer commitment to the war effort, as they include funding for the production of supplies.

Grants to purchase weapons and equipment through the Foreign Military Financing program.

Credit:
1: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2023/08/04/ukraine-war-us-spending/

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